Monday, September 26, 2016

Interview with a Moto-Vlogger: Motordadcle

After a summer of watching talented Moto-Vloggers and admiring them for making such great videos on youTube I reached out to a few to put together this series. Some were kind enough to take the time to let me pick their brains and force them to ‘write’ in order to bring to you an inside glimpse of who they are and why they do what they do.  

So without further ado lets get to know the person behind the video camera....   




Rider Name: Motordadcle
Real Name:  Andrew              
Location:     Toronto Ontario, Canada 





TFC: When did you start riding & why?

Andrew: I started riding around 3 and a half years ago. As to why, I think it was a mixture of a few things. I’ve always wanted to ride motorcycles from the first time I was on one. It was a 125cc dirtbike out in the woods. And it was amazing. I was suddenly 36 years old, with two kids, and hadn’t taken the leap. I guess it was partly an old age thing. Partly because I wanted my son and daughter to grow up around motorcycles, to give them that love as well. The other reason was that at my age, the older people in your family start to pass away. I’d experienced the loss of a few family members to old age and cancer and thought “what am I waiting for?” I took a course, got a bike and a license. Done.

TFC: How did you come by your rider name? 

Andrew: I wanted something that had to do with who I was. Not the brand of bike I was on at the time, not something extreme that I’d out-grow. It’s really the word “motorcycle” with “dad” stuck in the middle. Motor-dad-cle. It’s lame. But it stuck.


Graffiti wall mural behind
 the Toronto Chinese
Archway as you enter
Toronto's China Town East
TFC: What do you ride now? 

Andrew: Right now I am riding a 2009 Yamaha FZ6R in Cadmium Yellow. It’s a 600cc bike classified as a Sport-Touring. I’ve recently stripped the fairings off and converted her to a bad-ass streetfighter. I love this bike. It’s fast as heck and comfortable enough for long rides.


TFC: Does your bike have a name?

Andrew: Yep. Her name is Betty after Betty (the blonde) from Archie Comics. I loved reading Archie comics as a kid.




Outside of Fort York, Toronto
TFC: What made you decide to start Moto-Vlogging?

Andrew: I had started watching a motovlogger named Accidental Broadcast. He’s out in Hawaii and the views and insight into his culture and daily life were really inspiring. Toronto is no Hawaii, but I thought maybe someone out there would find it interesting. 





Full fairing Betty at
Underpass Park, Toronto
TFC: What type of equipment do you use to produce your videos? 

Andrew: I use a helmet mounted GoPro Hero 3+ Silver with a lav mic wired into my helmet. I also have a second camera that I can mount on the bars to give the perspective of myself while riding, that camera is a Sony AS15. I edit on a super old MacBook – the all white, fat one. It’s got enough RAM to run Adobe Premiere Pro, which is my edit software of choice.



TFC: What is the most challenging part of putting together your videos?

Andrew: Time. Subscribers need to realize - and a lot do - that this is a hobby for 99% of moto vloggers. I have a full-time job, a family to support, kids to manage, etc. Typically editing one 5-minute video takes me about 4 hours of work. That is hard to find every week. BUT, the reward of getting comments from people who value the effort and enjoy the content makes it all worthwhile.



Andrew excited about the first ride of 2016
TFC: Any advice for someone wanting to get into Moto-Vlogging?

Andrew: I would say, do your own thing. I see a lot of motovloggers start out and they are basically doing what the big motovloggers are doing. Not copying but mimicking. Find something that excites YOU or something interesting about where YOU live or something that makes YOU unique. That will get you more comments than anything else. Also, don’t care about subscriber numbers. Don’t get me wrong, I love all my subs and value every single one, but I’m not doing this to get to 100K. I’m doing this in the hopes that some people out there get some enjoyment out of my work. If I made you smile, my jobs done.



The arches in front of Hart House,
University of Toronto
TFC: I have a moto-bucket list of places I would love to ride my bike someday. If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

Andrew: I’d love to ride in Hawaii with Accidental Broadcast - such a beautiful place to just roam around on a dirt bike. The other place I’d love to go ride is Eastern Canada’s Cabot Trail – again, the scenic nature and winding roads are amazing.





TFC: Any last words or advice for motorcyclists?

Andrew: If you’re just getting your license, take a motorcycle safety course. It’s so good. After that practice a lot. Maybe take an advanced riding course too. The more prepared you are the longer you’ll be alive and able to ride. 

Whatever you want to do in life – go and do it, right now. You have one life, and it’s yours to create and shape. So make it fun. Motorcycling is a community and a lifestyle, it’s the best feeling to be able to ride up to another biker anywhere and just start talking. It’s like you’re bonded just because you’re both on two wheels.




Check Motordadcle out for yourself! Subscribe, Like him, Leave him a comment!
Motordadcle YouTube channel
Motordadcle Swag 




Places to connect with you:
Twitter @motordadcle 
Facebook
Instagram 


**************************************************

YOU THERE...


If you are a Moto-Vlogger and are interested in getting featured on my new series you can find me on Twitter and send a DM to @theFrozenCanuck or you can email TheFrozenCanuck.ca@gmail.com with your youTube channel. I will review your channel and as long as you meet my discriminating values I will contact you. I have to set some standards :)


Until next time.... 





Cruising through Life & Enjoying the Ride...

Monday, September 19, 2016

Interview with a Moto-Vlogger: The Tartan Visor

After a summer of watching talented Moto-Vloggers and admiring them for making such great videos on youTube I reached out to a few to put together this series. Some were kind enough to take the time to let me pick their brains and force them to ‘write’ in order to bring to you an inside glimpse of who they are and why they do what they do.  

So without further ado lets get to know the person behind the video camera....   





Rider Name: Tartan Visor
Real Name:     Jim
Location:       Scotland








TFC: When did you start riding & why?

Jim: I passed my test in Feb 2003 but didn't get my first bike until 2005/2006 but it was just a 125cc for getting to work and even then I only had it for a year. This year (2016) is when I started to take full advantage of it. I've always wanted a bike and I love the freedom you get from it and meeting like minded bikers.

TFC: How did you come by your rider name? 

Jim: I choose it myself when I started moto-vlogging. I'm Scottish so thats where the "Tartan" bit comes from and "Visor" as the viewer is kind of seeing from my perspective.


Nina
TFC: What do you ride now? 

Jim: I have a Kawasaki ZX7R Ninja

TFC: Does your bike have a name?

Jim: Yes! She's called Nina....Nina the Ninja :)



TFC: What made you decide to start Moto-Vlogging?

Jim: I've seen various moto-vloggers and a good few of them have said "if you think that you can do it, then just go out there and try it!" so I did :)


Bike Meet
TFC: What type of equipment do you use to produce your videos? 

Jim: I now use 2 cameras for capture. My main cam is the original Drift HD720 (didn't want to spend to much if I didn't like it, so picked it up second hand). The other cam is a little cheap one called kitvision splash action camera. For editing I use a Toshiba laptop (it's a few years old) and I've just started using Sony Vegas Pro 13, before that I used Power Director 11

TFC: What is the most challenging part of putting together your videos?

Jim: I've got a bad habit of making my vlogs long! So cutting out a lot of footage while still making sure the vlog makes sense is probably the hardest thing lol


TFC: Any advice for someone wanting to get into Moto-Vlogging?

Jim: Just the same that got me into it! If you think you can do it and want to try it then go out there and do it! You don't need to have the latest all singing all dancing equipment to do it either! Just get the basics and go for it! If you need help there's plenty of vloggers that will be willing to help you on your way..........like me! Just ask :)


TFC: I have a moto-bucket list of places I would love to ride my bike someday. If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

Jim: I would have to say Canada. I love the place!  I've been there many times while I was serving in the Army, so I got to see a good bit of it. The last time I was there was for just over a month to do various climbs in the Canadian Rockies, so jumping on a Harley Road King and traveling through Banff, Jasper and Canmore would be mind idea of pure heaven!

TFC: Any last words or advice for motorcyclists?

Jim: Nothing I can say that most bikers don't already know, so I'll just leave it with "Ride Safe!"

Check The Tartan Visor out for yourself! Subscribe, Like em, Leave him a comment!
The Tartan Visor youTube channel 

Places to connect with you:
Twitter @TheTartanVisor 
Facebook
The Tartan Visor’s Facebook Like Page 






********************************************************************


YOU THERE...
If you are a Moto-Vlogger and are interested in getting featured on my new series you can find me on Twitter and send a DM to @theFrozenCanuck or you can email TheFrozenCanuck.ca@gmail.com with your youTube channel. I will review your channel and as long as you meet my discriminating values I will contact you. I have to set some standards :)



Until next time.... 



Cruising through Life & Enjoying the Ride...

Monday, September 12, 2016

Interview with a Moto-Vlogger: Indian48

After a summer of watching talented Moto-Vloggers and admiring them for making such great videos on youTube I reached out to a few to put together this series. Some were kind enough to take the time to let me pick their brains and force them to ‘write’ in order to bring to you an inside glimpse of who they are and why they do what they do.  

So without further ado lets get to know the person behind the video camera....   



Rider Name: Indian48 (But let’s call him Hawkeye :) 

Real Name:  Eric       
     
Location:  Detroit, Michigan (Previously: Scottsdale Arizona)






View from behind the handlebars of the
Indian Chief Vintage,
headed North in Arizona to Winslow
TFC: When did you start riding & why?

Eric: First, I’ll say it’s an honor just to be asked these questions, because frankly, I’m a newbie.  I started out doing this because I thought it would be fun for people to see someone with 0 long-distance experience try to go around 48 states and film it. 

 Somewhere along the way, I actually got some experience under my belt, and here I am!  So, I hope this doesn’t come across as an experienced guy talking to newer folks – really it’s a newer guy who still has a lot to learn, passing along what I can tell you so far.  So here goes.

I got my first bike, a Honda CBR600 F4i, when I was 21.  I always wanted a motorcycle, and that was the first time in my life where I had a job and I could afford one!  It was one of my first post-college purchases.  I’d just graduated from Michigan State, and instead of using my salary from my first job to pay off debt or to get an apartment, I moved right back in with my parents and bought a bike.  Looking back, I suppose you could say I had some pretty patient parents.  I liked the CBR, and it really helped me to learn more about motorcycling to practice on that bike, but I found that I didn’t have a lot of friends to ride with, and sport bikes tend to have a way of making you want to go try dumb things…so when I eventually sold it, I was actually happy to watch it go, while I still had all of my limbs in the right places.

TFC: How did you come by your rider name? 

Eric: I don’t know if I really have a rider name – just a name for my website.  I went with “Indian48” because I really love the Indian motorcycle I ended up getting, and I decided to go to all 48 states in the continental U.S. on it.  So, it’s not the most creative name.  It just explains what I did.  

If I did have a rider name, I think it would be something really cool like Hawkeye or Gryphon or something.  My friend’s young son thought I looked like Hawkeye from the Avengers movies, and that was probably the best compliment I’ve ever received.  So, if everyone wants to start calling me Hawkeye I’m totally good with that.  But otherwise I just go by “Eric,” or “that guy with all the tassels on his bike.” 


Beautiful day in Arizona –
one of my favorite places to ride.
This one is just South of Winslow.
TFC: What do you ride now?

Eric: I ride a red 2014 Indian Chief Vintage, loaded up with every leather bag and set of tassels you can buy for it, with the exception of the tassels that get in the way when you’re trying to open the saddle bags.  It’s by far the favorite of all bikes I’ve owned.  

My first cruiser was a Harley 100th anniversary Fat Boy.  I loved that bike too, but it didn’t have bags, and the previous owner had lowered it, so it would bottom out if I had a passenger and hit a manhole cover or a bump.  After that I had a Harley Road Glide.  That bike was nice, but at the time I still didn’t feel experienced enough to go long distances, and so I didn’t really get the most out of it or appreciate it.  It felt too heavy to use to just cruise around town on my own without going big distances, and so I sold that one.

TFC: Does your bike have a name?

Eric: A couple of times I’ve referred to her as “Falcor,” like that dragon dog from the Never Ending Story movie, but I really don’t call it that.  After going across most of Montana one day I did get a little loopy and start patting her on the tank as I rode, letting “her” know she was doing great and having a small conversation with her.  So, though Falcor didn’t stick, the anthropomorphism did, and she’s now taken on a nameless female persona.  

On a recent trip across New Mexico, an inebriated man at a gas station insisted for about 10 minutes that I was like Roy Rogers and needed to call her “Trigger,” but that didn’t stick.  When I was a kid, I had one of those plastic horses mounted to a metal frame with springs, and it’s name was Trigger.  I don’t think you’re supposed to have two Triggers in one lifetime, so that wouldn’t work.


The Monument to the Four Corners
riders in Madawaska, Maine,
the far Northeast corner of the U.S.
TFC: What made you decide to start Moto-Vlogging?

Eric: It actually was kind of an accident.  I didn’t know anything about “vlogging” or “YouTubers” when I got started.  My plan was actually to make more of a documentary-style film when I began my 48 state, 4-corner trip.  I had been in touch with a professional documentarian about that, and I was geared up to create that kind of a film.  I just didn’t have a “story.”  After the first trip was done, and the 48 states and 4 corners were behind me, I started to label the footage and just post short clips to share the beautiful scenery.  

That’s when I got interested in other YouTubers like Casey Neistat.  I started watching Casey’s VLOG and I thought: That’s what I need to be doing – not creating one big story – but creating a ton of small stories to share about my riding experiences.  Once I understood that there was a genre like that that “fit” the types of stories and footage I had collected, I started publishing them in that way.  I’ve had a blast with it and that’s what I’m still doing.  I really enjoy the idea of releasing a lot of small, single-serving films, instead of one long one.  I also think the world has much more of an appetite for that now than they do for long-form documentaries with one big message. 


Wide open road in Montana
TFC: What type of equipment do you use to produce your videos? 

Eric: I use a Canon 80D DSLR with a Rode shotgun mic and a 10-18mm Canon lens to shoot most of my footage while off the bike.  That setup is really incredible.  I started with a Canon T5i and quickly realized how bad it was at image stabilization and auto-focus for movies.  That was a mistake to buy.  I’d been taking advice from YouTubers who had a fixed set and never moved while filming.  

The T5i is great for that, but as soon as you’re moving around, it loses any ability to perform as an auto-focusing video camera.  I use a GoPro Hero 4 Silver for all of my on-motorcycle footage.  Sometimes it’s mounted onto the front of my helmet (I rigged it up using a ton of tape), and sometimes I just have it in my hand and shoot freely, just moving it around with my arm.  

I have a cheap lapel mic mounted with double-sided mounting tape to the inside of my helmet so I can talk when I ride, but as you’ll see in my movies, I usually don’t do that.  I narrate a story afterward, or while I’m stopped, and then I use that audio overtop of the footage from the road.  That style seems to fit me best.  I also recently picked up a DJI Phantom 4 drone which is the most fun thing I’ve ever purchased as an adult.  That can add some real context to the movies, but it also can be dangerous and illegal, so I’m careful with it.



The Newbugh-Beacon Bridge
 spanning the Hudson river
in New York
TFC: What is the most challenging part of putting together your videos?

Eric: For me it’s thinking of a compelling story that will draw people in, and not just posting a bunch of footage.  I think it’s great that some people want to just sit and watch beautiful scenery!  But, I also want to capture people who want to hear about what happened during the trip.  To do that best, I really need to be thinking as I ride about what I should be narrating, what the “story” is behind the day, and how that will all come together in the end. 

 Unfortunately, I’m just brand new to that and only starting to do it at a level I think will interest viewers.  So most of my early films were just riding with music behind me, and my later stuff has been me doing narration way after the end of the ride, trying to make a story out of something that happened a month ago.


“Standin’ on the Corner”
monument in
Winslow, Arizona
TFC: Any advice for someone wanting to get into Moto-Vlogging?

Eric: Sure!  Here’s a bulleted list:

·         First, get really comfortable riding.  Practice.  Get into a parking lot and do fast-stops.  Go through cones or coke cans you set up.  Ride miles on open roads.  Get to be a motorcyclist – know how to ride and operate within your comfort zone.  I just saw a new moto-vlogger with a brand new bike, go out and dump his bike on its side on his first motovlog ride.  He should take a few years to ride and get comfortable before he starts worrying about filming himself.  I had been a rider for over 16 years before I started trying to film it.

·         Get really good at editing.  To me (after having a good story), editing makes 99% of the difference between something viewable and something people click away from.  Editing can make poor footage work, and it can make great footage even better.

·         Make interesting stuff.  If you get bored watching your own stuff, someone else will get REALLY bored.  Leave them wanting more, not less.  If you watch masters at this like Casey Neistat, they completely understand how short people’s attention spans are, and they’ll flip to a new scene, segment, or topic every 8 seconds or so, at most.  Cut, cut, cut.  Leave only the most interesting stuff.  I spend a lot of time cutting out even the shortest pauses as I speak, so the videos don’t cause people to lose interest.

·         Test your equipment a lot before you use it.  Once you’re out there on the road, it really compromises your safety if you have to fuss with your equipment at all.  You need your stuff to be working and accessible.  If it’s not, get off the bike, get it working right, then start up again.  No fussing with the camera on the road.

·         Don’t worry about what anyone will think of your art.  Just create your stuff!  Enjoy that creative process!  If you get some bad comment, delete it and block the person.  This should be about creating for the sake of creation.  Don’t do something to get attention.  Do something because you loved creating it and you’re proud of it.  Then, if attention follows, great!  If it doesn’t…fine.  Make more stuff.  The fun in this is the journey (literally) on your motorcycle, and the art of creating these neat little films.


Riding up the coast on the Indian Chief Vintage,
Just after crossing the Golden Gate Bridge
in San Francisco, CA
TFC: I have a moto-bucket list of places I would love to ride my bike someday. If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

Eric: I’m kind of strange in a couple of ways. One, I don’t have much of a “bucket list.”  If I get interested enough in something, I just find a way to do it as fast as possible.  So, if I started to get that kind of interest in a place to ride, I’d try to get there within a few months.  It would be neat to head up through Canada and into Alaska in the summer.  I’d enjoy that trip next.

Two, I’ve traveled to many countries, and I LOVE motorcycling and living in the USA to the extent I don’t have a lot of curiosity to travel overseas.  I could just ride up and down the Pacific Coast Highway all the way up through Oregon and Washington, and through Montana, Arizona, Colorado, Utah --- I’d be happy doing that for good.  There’s so much here in the U.S.  Someday if I had the chance I suppose I’d enjoy a trip around the coast of Australia, or a trip through some parts of Europe.

TFC: Any last words or advice for motorcyclists?

Eric: I’m new to this and still learning, and I hope I never lose that mindset.  I think it’s important that we all keep perspective and maintain that little bit of fear that keeps us from doing anything dumb.  Unfortunately, the stats show that this goes away and for a little while riders get overconfident, and get into accidents because of that.  So I’d say, read the Proficient Motorcycling book by David L. Hough, then read it again and again.  Never do anything that’s out of your comfort zone. 

Don’t ride with others who do things you don’t think are safe.  If that happens, don’t be scared to be the guy who just lets them move on ahead.  You can meet up with them at the hotel.  Also, follow your gut.  Sometimes you’ll get a feeling that a certain ride just isn’t right.  

I remember I was going to take a trip up to Prescott from here in Phoenix one time, and I was all packed up to do it.  Something had me thinking, this trip does not feel right, and so I just didn’t go.  I wish I could tell you some incredible story like, because I didn’t go, I avoided a head-on collision with a truck.  But the thing is, I didn’t go, and so I have no clue of whether or not I avoided anything.  I just think that safety is what’s most important, and so, you should follow your instincts, practice a lot, ride within your comfort zone, and (all the things you’ve heard before).  That stuff is real.  Every once in a while, take a look at a YouTube video of people’s body parts all over the highway to keep you humble.


Check Indian48 out for yourself! 
Subscribe, Like em, Leave him a comment!

Indian48 youTube channel

Places to connect with you:
Twitter @Indian48Eric
Facebook 
Instagram
Website





*************************************************************


YOU THERE...
If you are a Moto-Vlogger and are interested in getting featured on my new series you can find me on Twitter and send a DM to @theFrozenCanuck or you can email TheFrozenCanuck.ca@gmail.com with your youTube channel. I will review your channel and as long as you meet my discriminating values I will contact you. I have to set some standards :)




Cruising through Life & Enjoying the Ride...

Monday, September 5, 2016

Interview with a Moto-Vlogger: VRIDETV

After a summer of watching talented Moto-Vloggers and admiring them for making such great videos on youTube I reached out to a few to put together this series. Some were kind enough to take the time to let me pick their brains and force them to ‘write’ in order to bring to you an inside glimpse of who they are and why they do what they do.  

So without further ado lets get to know the person behind the video camera....   
The Riders

Rider Name: 
That guy from VRIDETV

Real Name:   Jeff             

Location:      Aldergrove, BC




TFC: When did you start riding & why?

Jeff: It all began on a little dirt bike at age 7 and from there on.... I was hooked on two wheels!

TFC: How did you come by your rider name? 

Jeff: Actually, the bike gets recognized as VRIDETV with all the camera equipment, I'm just the guy that rides it : )  


VRIDETV's 2003 Harley-Davidson
100th anniversary VRSCA V-Rod.
Equipped with
3 Sony Professional HD
video cameras mounted.
TFC: What do you ride now?

Jeff: 2003 Harley Davidson V-Rod. 
Read about how Jeff teamed up with the best of the best in the motorcycle industry to transform his stock V-Rod into the ultimate touring motorcycle... Project V-Rod.





TFC: Does your bike have a name?

Jeff: CameraBike



Jeff's x-ray after a near fatal
motorcycle accident
with a tow truck
TFC: What made you decide to start Moto-Vlogging?

Jeff: After seven years of recovery from my near fatal motorcycle accident, I decided to not only start riding again but to actually ride across Canada. In April of 2006, we mounted a high definition video camera to the handlebars of my motorcycle intending on taping our trip. We wanted to have our journey captured  to view it for years to come. While on our trip we heard the same question from people on a daily basis, "what's that thing on your handlebars". (Referring to the camera). We explained that we were traveling across Canada and taping our adventure. The second question was, "how can I see it?".  This happened repeatedly, almost every time we stopped. People of all ages would come up to us and express interest, share stories and give us ideas of where to ride next.  


TFC: What type of equipment do you use to produce your videos? 

Jeff: Final Cut Pro editing software on a Mac Pro.

TFC: What is the most challenging part of putting together your videos?

Jeff: Editing, it's a time consuming process and you always seem to find parts you want to edit.... But deadlines have to be met.

TFC: Any advice for someone wanting to get into Moto-Vlogging?

Jeff: Get your shot as steady as possible.

TFC: I have a moto-bucket list of places I would love to ride my bike someday. If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

Jeff: Europe, I've seen some amazing videos from places I'd love to ride and shoot video of.


VRIDETV's message to all riders 
TFC: Any last words or advice for motorcyclists?

Jeff: May all your rides be safe & scenic, Filled with blue skies & winding roads.






Check VRIDETV.com out for yourself! 
Subscribe, Like him, Leave him a comment !


VRIDETV Logo
VRIDETV youTube Channel
VRIDETV swag

Places to connect with VRIDETV:
Twitter @VRIDETV 
Facebook
Google +
Instagram
Website


***************************************************************

YOU THERE...
If you are a Moto-Vlogger and are interested in getting featured on my new series you can find me on Twitter and send a DM to @theFrozenCanuck or you can email TheFrozenCanuck.ca@gmail.com with your youTube channel. I will review your channel and as long as you meet my discriminating values I will contact you. I have to set some standards :)


Until next time.... 







Cruising through Life & Enjoying the Ride...

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Coming to a Moto-blog near you...

I know that I do not post as much when I am (working my a** off) here in Canada. If fact my posts are very few and far between, I apologize for that. Really, I just don’t lead that exciting of a life when I am at home and bike-less. I have always thought, if I have nothing worthwhile to say I might as well save my breath, or in this case my fingers. Who really cares that I had a hamburger for supper last night... [Insert awkward silence cricket sound here] ...yeah that is what I thought.  But lucky for you, I have finally come up with an idea that has been rattling around in my head to write about. 

To vlog or not to vlog...
Since I started my motorcycle blog I had always wanted to venture into the world of video. There is so much that I see when I ride, but it never has a chance to get into a still photo on my blog. I would never give up my blog, once a writer always a writer, but I think it sure would be cool to try my hand at a moto-vlog someday. I think that incorporating it into my blog would add an interesting aspect to it. I could be a blovlogger... okay that was just weird.

Tossing it around, I admit I am a little nervous about the whole venture though. Not only the expense of buying the equipment,  I also image there is a bit of a learning curve to them too. (Not to mention I hate the way my voice sounds on a recording - a cross between Mickey Mouse and Lisa Simpson). After some research, I found that video cameras are similar to a regular camera, albeit with varying skill levels. To be honest, my camera is just a point and shoot. Simple and does the job, kinda like me. Half the time I am just pointing it in the direction of what I want to take a picture of and hoping the damn thing takes the shot that I want when I blindly press the button.  (So far that technique seems to work for me). Then there is the editing that is involved to produce a half decent video. I am guessing it would be like editing my blogs only different, ha! BTW there is a lot of babbling that get cuts out before I actually post what I have written... imagine that. 

Then the time factor, working, doing a blog and then adding video into the mix...well wouldn’t that be a shame if I had to quit my day job - hint hint for anyone out there who wants to hire me. The moto-vloggers do make it look easy though, but I know they put a lot of hours into it and I commend them for their hard work just for my pure enjoyment. (heh heh) Anyway, that is just one thing that rattles in my brain when I can’t ride. Best I not get into what else rattles around in there. I guess I will just keep it on the back burner rattling for now and leave it up to the moto-vloggers of the world.... 

Thinking about that led me to think of...
Because I am ‘two-wheel-less’ during the peak time of motorcycling in my neck of the woods I turned to watching Moto-Vlogs.  It sure is helping to ease my separation anxiety and somewhat placates me due to my lack of riding. I really admire those Moto-Vloggers for putting together some top quality footage of their rides and they can be quite entertaining too!

Come to think of it, there is not much of a difference between a Moto-Blogger and a Moto-Vlogger, besides the fact that one is like reading a book and the other watching a movie. Okay there is a difference,  but you know what I mean. We are just people with a passion for our motorcycles and like to share our experiences and knowledge on different platforms to you. 

I recently reached out to a few of the Moto-Vloggers that I have been watching on youTube and some of them were kind enough to take the time to let me pick their brains and force them to ‘write’ in order to bring to you an inside glimpse of who they are and why they do what they do. 

So starting next week I will present my new series.... Interview with a Moto-Vlogger! (Not to be confused with Interview with a vampire - no infringement on copyright is intended, in fact it wasn’t until I made the title that the movie popped into my head... see I am babbling again...)  

 So tune in next week!!! 

YOU THERE...
If you are a Moto-Vlogger and are interested in getting featured on my new series you can find me on Twitter and send a DM to @theFrozenCanuck or you can email theFrozenCanuck.ca@gmail.com with your youTube channel. I will review your channel and as long as you meet my discriminating values I will contact you. Sorry, but I have to set some standards :)



Cruising through Life & Enjoying the Ride....

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Raising Awareness for Veterans - The Tartan Visor

Since getting back to Canada I started following a lot of moto-vloggers so I could vicariously ride while being bike-less. That and I just enjoy the content that these talented vloggers create. One in particular vlogger who I connected with on Twitter rides over in Scotland and goes by the name of The Tartan Visor. It has been about 3 months since I had connected with him on Twitter, subscribed to his channel on YouTube and have been watching him develop his channel ever since. 


Check him out: #TheTartanVisor 




So today while doing my regular 'Twitter Good Morning' chirps with my Twitter Friends I came across a notification from The Tartan Visor who currently is doing the #22PushupChallenge to combat veteran stress. 

To my surprise he nominated me to do this challenge! 

*Blush* I have to admit, it was cool to hear my name mentioned in his vlog. 


Well seeing I can't even remember the last time I even attempted to do a push-up and the fact that I am blogger not a vlogger I began to think that this challenge (one that I felt I needed to at least do something for because it is such a great cause) was going to present a few problems for me. So as not to disappoint my Tartan friend I decided to do this post to help spread the awareness and hopefully send a few more donations his way. 

So what is it all about? The Tartan Visor is spreading awareness for veterans' mental health issues through raising donations on his moto-vlog. This particular charity is focused in the UK, however veterans from all over suffer the same debilitating symptoms of PTSD. All our veterans are important, so let's give back to these women and men who give so much of themselves for us. 

For those of you who do not know about this charity challenge for veterans; it actually started in the United States at the beginning of 2016. It was a way to create awareness for veterans' mental health issues and PTSD while at the same time donating to the charity. The challenge is to get people to video themselves doing 22 push-ups and then donate to the charity.  

The Tartan Visor has a little bit of a twist on this challenge and has taken the challenge a step further to combine the challenge into moto-vlogging and doing 22 push-ups each vlog over 22 days ending on Aug 28, 2016 with a Bike Meet.


So if any of my followers from Scotland are interested in donating and helping The Tartan Visor raise money for this cause here are all the links in one place: 
The Tartan Visor Facebook 
Bike Meet up info
The Tartan Visor -YouTube 
Follow The Tartan Visor on Twitter  @tartanvisor
About the Charity Combat Stress UK 

Keep the rubber side down my Tartan Friend :)  Great work!

I thought I should also provide these additional links:
22pushups.ca 
PTSD Association of Canada 
22kill.com